What Happens When CA Property Is Not Deeded Into a Living Trust

Old Orange County courthouse

Old Orange County courthouse

Revocable Living Trusts are popular in California and a way that lots of people hold title to their real estate and other assets.

However, some people forget or neglect to transfer their assets into that trust.

Example is that a mortgage lender might not want the borrower to be a trust, so the buyer acquires the property as an individual or couple, intending to deed the property to the trust later.  Then the buyer forgets.  This can happen with a refinance when it is taken out of the trust and the owner forgets to put it back in the trust.

Revocable Living trust -b-This can result in later problems.  The original creators of the trust pass on, and it is up to the successor trustee to dispose of the assets and distribute the proceeds (or whatever is specified in the will).  But the successor trustee can’t sell the house (or boat, or car) because it was not put into the trust.

A recent ruling by California’s Fourth Appellate District Court of Appeal (Ukkestad v. RBS Asset Finance, March 16, 2015) has some positive news for those (or for the heirs of those) who forget to place assets in their trust.

Facts of the case:  “Larry Gene Mabee, who died on December 16, 2012 executed a First Amendment and Complete Restatement of the Trust on December 7, 2012 (the Trust Instrument), appointing himself as the trustee. On that same date, Mabee also executed a will, which contains a pour-over provision giving the residue of the estate to the trustees of the Trust.

Mabee owned two parcels of real estate that are the subject of this appeal: (1) a parcel at 1025 East Bobier Drive, in Vista, California; and (2) a parcel known as 80501 Avenue 48, Space 114, in Indio, California (collectively, the Two Parcels). According to the grant deeds, title to the Two Parcels was held by Mabee as an individual.

The Trust Instrument does not describe the Two Parcels by reference to any specific identifying information unique to those properties, such as the address or legal description of the Two Parcels. Although not specifically identifying the Two Parcels, the Trust Instrument generally states that Mabee assigns the ownership of all of his real property to the trustees of the Trust effective immediately.”

Subsequent to Mabee’s death, successor trustee, Daniel Ukkestad, started to follow a procedure that, for many years, has been in place in California for situations when a decedent’s property had been intended to be in a trust, but had not been properly titled.

Ukkestad “filed a petition under Probate Code Section 850, subdivision (a)(3) for an order confirming that the Two Parcels are part of the Trust’s assets, premised on … language from the Trust Instrument.”  That language said in part, “The Grantor, by the execution of this instrument, hereby assigns, grants, and conveys to the Trustees of this instrument all of the Grantor’s right, title and interest in and to all of his real and personal property…”

The probate court was provided with deeds showing that Mabee was the owner of the Two Parcels.

The Probate Court denied the petition for an order confirming that the Two Parcels were trust assets.  The Trust had a declaration, but that declaration did not specifically refer to the Two Parcels.  Without a specific description, the Probate Court held that they could not be confirmed as assets of the Trust.

But the Appellate Court reversed the decision of the Probate Court and noted that “our Supreme Court (in California) recently endorsed a ‘flexible, pragmatic view,’ under which uncertain written contractual terms comply [with the requirement of certainty of meaning] as long as they can be made certain by reference to extrinsic evidence…” As an earlier case had put it, “the governing principle is: ‘That is certain which can be made certain.'” – and that “the Trust Instrument contains language that identifies which of Mabee’s real property is being conveyed to the trust. Specifically, in the Trust Instrument, Mabee refers to ‘all of his real and personal property, including … real property …, wherever situated.” From there they went on to observe, “it is a simple matter of referring to publicly available records to determine Mabee’s real estate holdings.”

Lesson Learned:  Specifically identifying property in the trust (or in an attachment) and correctly placing it in the trust is still the best practice.

However, the Ukkestad case also informs that if we don’t do everything right, there’s still a chance of a good outcome.  See California’s Court of Appeal decision in (Ukkestad v. RBS Asset Finance, March 16, 2015- click here).

By Harrison K. Long.  Source of some information for this is an article by Bob Hunt, August 3, 2015, about “What happens to property when it is not deeded into a trust”.

This article is for information only and is not the providing of legal services.  If you have such a situation where a trustee or trust administrator did not put a property in the trust as was intended by the trustor, you should contact an experienced real estate and/or estate planning attorney.

Posted in California laws, California real estate, California real estate laws, Estate planning, Taxes and estate planning, Trust & Probate Property | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Homeowner Leasing of Solar Panels Can Be Risky

solar panel installationHomeowner leasing of solar panels can be tricky and cause challenges when it comes to sell or refinance the home.

Kenneth R. Harney said at his March 22, 2015 article:  “Can going green by leasing solar panels for your roof cost you money — or give you headaches — when you go to sell the house?  Possibly both.”

Some home buyers are hesitant to get involved in a deal where they will need to qualify to buy the house – and also qualify to take over financial obligation on the solar panel leases.

When buyers take over solar panel leases, they take them as is – or that the home seller pays for entire lease obligation at close of escrow on the purchase and sale.

Residential solar installations are booming — up by 50% per year since 2012, according to the Solar Energy Industries Assn.  More than 600,000 homes and businesses now have on-site solar, with the fastest growth rates occurring in Maryland, Massachusetts and New York.  SolarCity is the biggest provider, and it’s well-supported by venture capital.

Home sellers need to beware of the potential legal and financing complexities that can occur when you lease, rather than buy, solar panels.  If you lease, you should know and understand your obligations, and talk to your current utility company about the savings claimed.  If you have a leased system and plan to sell, contact the leasing company in advance to learn about the lease transfer and buyout options – and be ready for problems.

By Harrison K. Long.  California Real estate broker (Cal Bre 01410855) and professional Realtor representative – also an attorney member of the California Bar Association (member #69137).  See my site at HarrisonKLong.com for information.  Contact me by email at HKLong@cox.net – or by cell or text at 949-701-2515.  Thanks.

Source of some information is the Kenneth Harney article (see link to article here).  This is for information only and is not the providing of legal services.

Posted in California laws, California real estate, California real estate laws, Solar energy, Solar panel leasing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CA Court of Appeal Rules in Favor of HOA on its Short-Term Rental Rules

Some homeowners associations in California have disputed whether a homeowner can violate its rules and rent out their homes on a short term basis.

An HOA adopted a rule that homeowners who rented out their homes could not do so for periods of less than seven days and imposed an annual fee on owners who rent out their homes. The purpose of the fee was to defray, at least partially, the extra costs to the HOA that were caused by renters.

The HOA can do this according to California’s Second Appellate District Court of Appeal (Oak Shores Community Association v. Burlison, Second Appellate District, March 24, 2015).

The Oak Shores Community Association (HOA) is the governing body of Oak Shores, which has 660 parcels developed with single-family homes.  Some homes are occupied by full-time residents, and about 66 percent are absentee owners who rent their homes to short-term vacation renters.

The HOA adopted a set of rules including minimal rental period of seven days and a $325 annual fee imposed on owners who rented their homes. Two owners sued the HOA challenging these rules under California Civil Code 1366.1 (since renumbered), which said that “An association shall not impose or collect an assessment or fee that exceeds the amount necessary to defray the costs for which it is levied.”

The trial court found in favor of the HOA, and the plaintiffs appealed.  The court of appeal found in favor of the HOA and quoted from an earlier California Supreme Court decision (Lamden v. La Jolla Shores Clubdominium Homeowners Assn.) saying, “Generally, courts will uphold decisions made by the governing board of an owners association so long as they represent good faith efforts to further the purposes of the common interest development, are consistent with the development’s governing documents, and comply with the public policy.”

The court of appeal also said “short-term renters cost the Association more than long-term renters or permanent residents is not only supported by the evidence but experience and common sense places the matter beyond debate.”

The court of appeal referenced other court case decisions (Laguna Royale Owners Assn. v Darger) that had upheld the rights of the HOA to impose minimum rental periods.

Question of attorney fees was resolved in favor of the HOA.  The court of appeal upheld the trial court’s decision in favor of the HOA, which had awarded attorney fees in the amount of $1,180,646.50 for the HOA.

In many areas of California, HOAs and communities are trying to figure out impact on owners and property valeus of short-term rentals brought about by organizations such as Airbnb.  This court ruling in Oak Shores will provide some guidence.  It will be interesting to see whether this court of appeal decision will eventually be determined by the CA Supreme Court.

By Harrison K. Long, Realtor and professional real estate representative, Evergreen Realty HomeSmart at Orange County CA – 949-854-7747 (direct) or 949-701-2515 (cell or text) – CAL BRE 01410855.  Also an attorney member of the CA State Bar Association #69137.  Source of some information here is article by Bob Hunt at RealtyTimes.

Posted in Homeowners Associations, Owners rights and tenants, Real estate law, Real estate transactions, Residential property | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Landlord Liability for a Tenant’s Pets in California

California Law re Landlord Liability for a Tenant’s Pets

Can the landlord be liable if the tenant’s dog bites or otherwise harms someone?

Posted in California Association of Realtors, California laws, California real estate, California real estate laws | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to Protect Your Home’s Property Tax Basis and Transfer to Replacement

Icon2-2

Your property taxesProperty taxes are very important for home owners at Orange County CA.

This is true because property taxes are based upon assessed values at Orange County, and those have values have increased significantly since 2009.

Property tax protectionsPeople who have owned a home at Orange County for a number of years often ask about protecting their property tax basis when they buy and move to another home.

Ad valorem property taxes in California are primarily guided by California Proposition 13, a constitutional amendment enacted by voters during 1978.CA proposition 13

Annual property taxes according to Proposition 13 to be paid by owners are generally equal to one percent of assessed value of the home each year. (This assessed value can be increased by as much as two percent per year by the county assessor.)

Example: If you buy a home at Orange County CA at price of $700,000, the property value determined by county assessor/tax collector will be $700,000. So your annual ad valorem property tax during first year would be one percent of that – or the amount of $7,000.

If you want to sell your home and buy a replacement home in Orange County, and if you follow California law guidelines, you can sell first and then buy a different home – or you can buy a home in Orange County first and later sell the prior house – while taking advantage of transfer of Proposition 13 property tax basis.

To protect and transfer your home’s property tax basis to another home, you must follow all conditions for qualification and property tax relief as set forth by the Office of Orange County Assessor.

Proposition 60 was a constitutional amendment approved by the voters of California in 1986 – codified in Section 69.5 of the California Revenue & Taxation Code – and allows the transfer of an existing Proposition 13 base year value from a former home to a replacement home, if certain conditions are met.

PEOPLE 55 YEARS OF AGE OR MOREThis protection benefit is open to homeowners once in a lifetime who are at least 55 years old and are able to meet all qualifying conditions.

The following conditions must all be met for qualification and property tax relief to be granted under California Proposition 60:

a) Both the original property (former residence) and its replacement must be located in the same county. If the replacement property is located in a different county from the original, see possible transfer basis rules set for at California Proposition 90.

b) As of the date of transfer of the original property, the seller or a spouse living with the seller must be at least 55 years old.

c) The original property must have been eligible for the Homeowners’ Exemption or entitled to the Disabled Veterans’ Exemption.

d) The replacement dwelling must be of equal or lesser value than the original property.

e) The replacement dwelling must have been purchased or newly constructed on or after 11/06/86.

f) Without exception, the replacement dwelling must be purchased or newly constructed within two years (before or after) of the sale of the original property.

g) The original property must be subject to reappraisal at its current fair market value as the result of its transfer, in accordance with Sections 110.1 or 5803 of the Revenue and Taxation Code.

h) Without exception, a claim for relief must be filed within three years of the date a replacement dwelling is purchased or new construction of a replacement dwelling is completed.

For more information about Orange County CA home selling and possible protection and transfer of property tax basis – see the web site at Office of Orange County CA Assessor.

Possible transferring your property tax basis from a home at Orange County CA while buying a replacement home at another county is a different subject – and covered by California Proposition 90. Orange and Riverside and two of the nine counties in California that are participating with the Prop 90 transfers between counties.

Coldwell Banker residential brokerage

By Harrison K. Long.  This is for information only about California law and is not the providing of legal or tax services. For questions about your own situation, you should consult with an experienced real estate attorney and/or with the office of Orange County Assessor where your home is located.

Providing professional REALTOR® agent representation and help for property owners, home sellers, private trust estate representatives, estate administrators, executors and heirs, probate and trust attorneys, estate planners, income tax professionals, public guardians, fiduciaries, investor group managers, bankers, and individuals, with listing and sale of properties at Orange County, CA. Contact us with your questions about home prices and values at Irvine, Newport Beach, Costa Mesa, and other Orange County CA cities and areas.

“How to Protect Your Home’s Property Tax Basis at Orange County CA and Transfer to a Replacement”

Posted in Home selling guide, OC home value guide, OC property value guide, Orange County home values, Orange County real estate, Property tax | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

California Court Holds Lender Waived Right to Deficiency Judgment

In First California Bank v. McDonald, a California court of appeal recently held that a lender waived its right to a deficiency judgment where it permitted the sale of real property outside of the judicial foreclosure without the borrower’s consent.

CA laws and Real EstateIn this case – First California Bank v. McDonald – a husband and wife signed a promissory note secured by a deed of trust against certain real property in California. They also provided additional security in the form of a deed of trust against a different property.  The wife subsequently sold the second property with the bank’s agreement that it would receive the proceeds from that property. There was no release as to the borrowers.  The bank’s note went into default after the husband died.  The bank subsequently filed a complaint for judicial foreclosure and sought a deficiency judgment against the wife and children. The trial court granted summary adjudication as to the bank’s claim for judicial foreclosure ordering the sale of the property. The court found that the wife and estate representatives were subject to a deficiency judgment for the unpaid amount.

The wife and estate appealed, contending that their arrangement with the bank released its deed of trust as to the second property and therefore, the bank had waived any right to a deficiency judgment under Code of Civil Procedure §726(a).

The court of appeals agreed and reversed. The appellate court found that the bank failed to follow the requirements of §726 and did not obtain the wife’s nor children’s consent or waiver that the property was being sold outside of judicial foreclosure. There was no evidence that the bank obtained their consent to the release of the secured interest in the property and there was no evidence as to how the proceeds of the sale were actually applied. As such, the bank waived its right to a judicial foreclosure.

Source of information is article by Shannon B. Jones, California real estate attorney  –  See court of appeal decision – http://www.courts.ca.gov/opinions/documents/F067812.PDF

By Harrison K. Long, real estate broker, Realtor, professional real estate representative and attorney at Orange County CA.

Coldwell Banker residential brokerage

 

 

We provide professional real estate agent and broker representation – help for property owners, home sellers, private trust estate representatives, estate administrators, executors and heirs, probate and trust attorneys, estate planners, income tax professionals, public guardians, fiduciaries, investor group managers, bankers, and individuals, with listing and sale of properties at Orange County, CA.  Contact us at 949-854-7747 with your questions about home prices and values at Orange County CA cities and areas with Home Selling and Real Estate market updates.  

This post about California law is for information only and is not the providing of legal services.  If you have questions about legal issues with your real estate situation or transaction, you should contact an experienced real estate attorney. 

Posted in California laws, California real estate, California real estate laws, Real estate law | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

California AB 1888: New CA Law on Real Estate Transaction Transparency

CA laws and Real Estate

California AB 1888:  New California Law on Real estate transaction transparency

CA Governor Brown approved Assembly Bill 1888 in June 2014, eliminating the option for parties to avoid disclosing in public records the amount of documentary transfer tax payable at closing of real estate transactions.

Purpose of this law is to make the value of each such transaction readily apparent, which many purchasers and sellers typically try to avoid.

Counties and cities are authorized to levy documentary transfer tax upon the recordation of documents transferring interests in real property.

CA Revenue and Taxation Code Section 11932 had provided that a document submitted for recordation must show the amount of documentary transfer tax due either on its face, or in a separate statement that is not recorded.

With the tax shown on the face of the recorded document, determining the purchase price in a transaction should be easy since the county/city tax used to determine the documentary transfer tax is known.

Parties wishing to avoid disclosing this information historically previously were previously allowed the ability to submit a separate, nonrecorded statement.

AB 1888 amends Section 11932 to address this lack of uniformity.  Assemblyman Phil Ting, the bill’s author, said that the purpose was to provide for transparency in the administration of California’s documentary transfer tax law, to resolve issue relating to the availability of transfer tax information under the California Public Records Act (CPRA), and [to] ensure that real estate appraisers have access to transfer tax information in order to accurately appraise real property.  He had contended that “the public is entitled to the information on the separate document concerning transfer taxes,” and that elimination of that option would resolve “any Public Records Act questions” while providing “confidence in the fair administration of California’s tax laws.”

Effective as of Jan. 1, 2015, Section 11932 – should make pricing information easier to determine.

Source of some information is article by Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP, Los Angeles law firm.

By Harrison K. Long, Realtor, real estate broker, and professional real estate representative at Orange County CA.

Coldwell Banker residential brokerage

 

 

We provide professional real estate agent and broker representation – help for property owners, home sellers, private trust estate representatives, estate administrators, executors and heirs, probate and trust attorneys, estate planners, income tax professionals, public guardians, fiduciaries, investor group managers, bankers, and individuals, with listing and sale of properties at Orange County, CA.  Contact us at 949-854-7747 with your questions about home prices and values at Orange County CA cities and areas with Home Selling and Real Estate market updates.  

This post about California law is for information only and is not the providing of legal services.  If you have questions about legal issues with your real estate transaction, you should contact an experienced real estate attorney. 

Posted in California laws, California real estate, Real estate law, Real estate transactions | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mortgage Rates Stay Down with Huge News For Home Buyers at Orange County CA

Purchase money lending

Fantastic news for homebuyers is that home loan mortgage rates at Orange County CA went down big-time during 2014 and have stayed down.

4.5% was the average rate on a 30-year fixed loan offered by lenders one year ago today –  see article from that time –Mortgage rate watch report for December 28, 2013.

Average payment on a $417k conforming loan one year ago was $2,113 per month.

3.75% is the average rate offered by lenders on a 30-year fixed loan at Orange County today on December 29, 2014 (for those who qualify) –  see article –Mortgage rate watch report for December 28, 2014.

Average payment on that same $417k loan is now $1,930 per month (for those who qualify).

So a monthly payment on that $417k conforming loan now will save a homebuyer $183 per month on payment as compared with same time last year.

What this means is that prospective homebuyers should get organized, qualified or pre-approved with a lender, and move forward with decisions to buy now!

Coldwell Banker residential brokerage

 

 

By Harrison K. Long, Realtor, real estate broker, and professional real estate representative at Orange County CA.    

Professional REALTOR® agent representation and help for property owners, home sellers, private trust estate representatives, estate administrators, executors and heirs, probate and trust attorneys, estate planners, income tax professionals, public guardians, fiduciaries, investor group managers, bankers, and individuals, with listing and sale of properties at Orange County, CA.  Contact us at 949-854-7747 with your questions about home prices and values at Orange County CA cities and areas with Home Selling and Real Estate market updates.

Posted in listing and selling homes, Live at Orange County, OC home value guide, OC property value guide, Orange County home values, Orange County real estate, Probate properties | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Does a Will Cover Everything I Own?

California estate planningDoes a Will Cover Everything I Own?

No. Generally speaking, your will affects only those assets that are titled in your name at your death. Those assets that are not affected by your will include Life insurance. The cash proceeds from an insurance policy on your life are paid to whomever you have designated as beneficiary of the policy in a form filed with the insurance company—no matter who the beneficiaries under your will may be.

  • Retirement plans. Assets held in retirement plans, such as a 401(k) or an IRA, are transferred to whomever you have named as beneficiary in the plan documents—no matter who the beneficiaries under your will may be.
  • Assets owned as a joint tenant with right of survivorship. Assets such as real estate, automobiles, bank accounts and stock accounts that are held in joint tenancy with right of survivorship will pass to the surviving joint tenant upon your death, and not in accordance with any directions in your will.
  • “Transfer on death” or “pay on death.” Certain securities and brokerage accounts include a designation of one or more beneficiaries to receive the assets in that account when the account owner dies. The names of the beneficiaries are preceded by the words “transfer on death” or “TOD.” Other assets, such as bank accounts and U.S. savings bonds, may be held in a similar form using the owner’s name and the beneficiaries’ names preceded by the words “paid on death” or “POD.”
  • “Community property with right of survivorship.” Married couples or registered domestic partners may hold title to their community property assets in their names as “community property with right of survivorship.” Then, when the first spouse or domestic partner dies, the assets pass directly to the surviving spouse or partner without being affected by the will.
  • Living trusts. Generally, assets held in a revocable living trust are distributed according to the instructions in the trust regardless of the instructions in your will—with no need for court supervision. You can name yourself as the initial trustee of your living trust (most people do), and then name a successor trustee to manage the trust if you become unable to do so. With a living trust, your assets are managed for your benefit during your lifetime and then transferred to your beneficiaries when you die without court supervision. For more detailed information, see the State Bar pamphlet entitled Do I Need a Living Trust? (See #1 for information on ordering pamphlets.)
  • Your spouse’s or domestic partner’s half of community property. In California, any assets acquired by you and your spouse or registered domestic partner from earnings during your marriage or registered domestic partnership are community property. You and your spouse or registered domestic partner own equal shares of those assets. Your will, therefore, affects only your half of the community property. Assets that either of you owned before your marriage or registered domestic partnership, and gifts or inheritances acquired later, are usually separate property. Your will affects all of your separate property assets.

Even if your entire estate consists of assets held in joint tenancy, a life insurance policy and a retirement plan, there are still good reasons for making a will. For example, if the other joint tenant dies before you do, then the property held in joint tenancy will be in your name alone and subject to your will. If named beneficiaries die before you do, the assets subject to a beneficiary designation may be payable to your estate. If you receive an unexpected bonus, prize, refund or inheritance, it would be subject to your will. And if you have minor children, nominating a guardian for them in your will is very important.

_____________

Source of this information is the California State Bar Association (www.CalBar.org). This is for information only about California law and is not the providing of legal services. If you have questions about your own situation and what is covered by your will, you should contact an experienced estate planning attorney.

Posted in California real estate, California real estate laws, California taxes, Estate planning, Taxes and estate planning, Trust & Probate Property | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Irvine Home Selling and Real Estate Market Update

Irvine Home Selling and Real Estate Market Update – November 22, 2014

Irvine CA homes and real estate market update

IMAG0187-c-Irvine CA is the economy driver at Orange County – has a population of about 230,000 people and is still growing.

Irvine homeowners and sellers have high expectations and confidence of the buyers.

530 Irvine homes are now listed for sale – with average list price of $1,131,333.

That’s a 9.2 percent drop in number of Irvine listings since November 1 (three weeks ago) when 584 Irvine homes were listed for sale.

It’s also a 28.3 percent drop in number of homes listed for sale since September 1 – when 740 Irvine homes were listed for sale.

121 Irvine sellers got buyers for homes under contract and went into escrow during the first 21 days of November – and average list price for those homes was $827,472.

The average list price of an Irvine home going into escrow is about 25 percent lower than average for sale listing price of all Irvine homes.

210 Irvine homes sold with closed deals during October 2014 – with average sold price at $902,560 – and average time on market for those homes was 72 days.

Irvine CA average home selling market time is now about 2.5 months – that time it would theoretically take to sell all homes on the market at current pace of sales.

Irvine home sellers who are serious are looking carefully at “fair market value” – the amount that other homes in the neighborhoods have actually sold for.

Irvine home selling markets are more balanced now as compared with last year November 2013 – with little or no advantage to either buyers or sellers. Buyers have improved negotiating power and choices.

More homes are sold and money spent to buy Irvine real estate as compared with any other city in the OC.

People are especially attracted to Irvine, because of its positive economy and jobs, famous and award-winning schools, that it is one of the safest cities in America, and some of the best weather anywhere.

See Shady Canyon Irvine homes for sale – click here.

See Irvine CA homes now listed for sale – click here

See Irvine single level homes now listed for sale – click here

See Woodbridge Irvine homes now listed for sale – click here.

See Quail Hill Irvine homes now listed for sale – click here.

See Northwood Irvine homes now listed for sale – click here.

See Turtle Rock Irvine homes now listed for sale – click here.

See Turtle Ridge homes now listed for sale – click here.

Coldwell Banker residential brokerageby Harrison K. Long. Source of some information is CRMLS multiple listing service and is for homes listed and sold by all brokers and agents.

Professional REALTOR® agent representation and help for property owners, home sellers, private trust estate representatives, estate administrators, executors and heirs, probate and trust attorneys, estate planners, income tax professionals, public guardians, fiduciaries, investor group managers, bankers, and individuals, with listing and sale of properties at Orange County, CA.

Contact us at 949-854-7747 with your questions about home prices and values at Irvine and other Orange County CA cities and areas and about Irvine Home Selling and Real Estate market update.

Posted in Irvine business, Irvine home values, Irvine homes, Irvine listings, Irvine real estate | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment